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What Are the Warning Signs of Breast Cancer?

Posted in Medshield Wellness   |   October 15th, 2020

Breast pain or lump: Is it cancer?

A sharp pain in your breast, possibly with some tenderness, may have you wondering if it could be something serious. A breast lump is often the first thing that women and even men notice that spurs a visit to their doctor.

Although breast cancer generally shows no symptoms in the early stage, timely detection can turn a story of breast cancer into a survivor’s tale.

Causes of pain and tenderness

We often associate pain with something wrong, so when women feel tenderness or pain in their breast, they often assume it to be breast cancer. However, breast pain is rarely the first noticeable symptom of breast cancer. Several other factors can cause the pain.

Clinically known as mastalgia, breast pain can also be caused by the following:

  • the fluctuation of hormones caused by menstruation
  • some birth control pills
  • some infertility treatment
  • a bra that doesn’t fit
  • breast cysts
  • large breasts, which may be accompanied by neck, shoulder, or back pain
  • Stress

Breast cancer signs and symptoms

Although a lump in the breast is typically associated with breast cancer, much of the time such lumps aren’t cancer, most are benign, or noncancerous.

Common causes of benign breast lumps include:

  • Breast infection
  • Fibrosystic Breast Disease (“lumpy breasts”)
  • Fibroidenoma (noncancerous tumor)
  • Fat necrosis (damaged tissue)

With fat necrosis, the mass can’t be distinguished from a cancerous lump without a biopsy.

Even though the majority of breast lumps are caused by less severe conditions, new, painless lumps are still the most common symptom of breast cancer.

Early on, a woman may notice a change in her breast when she performs a monthly breast exam or minor abnormal pain that doesn’t seem to go away. Early signs of breast cancer include:

  • changes in the shape of the nipple
  • breast pain that doesn’t go away after your next period
  • a new lump that doesn’t go away after your next period
  • nipple discharge from one breast that is clear, red, brown, or yellow
  • unexplained redness, swelling, skin irritation, itchiness, or rash on the breast
  • swelling or a lump around the collarbone or under the arm

A lump that is hard with irregular edges is more likely to be cancerous.

Later signs of breast cancer include:

  • retraction, or inward turning of the nipple
  • enlargement of one breast
  • dimpling of the breast surface
  • an existing lump that gets bigger
  • an “orange peel” texture to the skin
  • Vaginally pain
  • unintentional weight loss
  • Enlarged Lymph Nodes in the armpit
  • visible veins on the breast

Having one or more of these symptoms doesn’t necessarily mean you have breast cancer. Nipple discharge, for example, can also be caused by an infection. See your doctor for a complete evaluation if you experience any of these signs and symptoms.

Outlook and prevention

As with any cancer, early detection and treatment are major factors in determining the outcome. Breast cancer is easily treated and usually curable when detected in the earliest of stages.

The 5-year survival rate for breast cancer that is stage 0 to stage 2 is more than 90 percent. The 5-year survival rate for stage 3 cancer is more than 70 percent.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, according to the World Health Organization. Whether you’re concerned about breast pain or tenderness, it’s important to stay informed on risk factors and warning signs of breast cancer.

The best way to fight breast cancer is early detection. Talk to your doctor about when you should start scheduling regular mammograms.

If you’re worried that your breast pain or tenderness could be something serious, make an appointment with your doctor today. If you find a lump in your breast (even if your most recent mammogram was normal), see your doctor.

Source Credit : Department of Health (South Africa) and Healthline

Image Credit : 123rf

DISCLAIMER: The information on this blog post is for educational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. If you are experiencing symptoms or need health advice, please consult a healthcare professional.

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